Security Operation Center

A security operations center (SOC), also known as an information security operations center (ISOC), is a unified center where a network security team tracks, investigates, evaluates, and manages cybersecurity events, usually 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

A security operations center (SOC) can play a critical part in any organization’s information security program. A SOC, in particular, can assist in ensuring that unpatched vulnerabilities are spotted before any long-term damage is caused. In this article, we will look at what a SOC is and its functions.

What Is A SOC?

A security operations center (SOC) is a cybersecurity team mainly responsible for reviewing and evaluating an organization’s cybersecurity. Their primary goal is to detect, analyze, and advise on how to respond to cybersecurity breaches. They typically collaborate with incident response teams, flagging concerns and providing suitable incident responses.

The SOC analyzes possible cyber threats to servers, information, communications, interfaces, websites, apps, and systems of all types. They may also be involved in testing the organization’s network infrastructure to identify risks that they can address. They generally utilize probes, firewalls, and SIEM technologies to evaluate active sources, create new guidelines, and improve your team’s ability to respond effectively to security vulnerabilities.

What Does A SOC Do?

The SOC manages real-time incident response and promotes ongoing security enhancements to defend the corporation from cybersecurity threats. A well-functioning SOC will provide the following services by utilizing a sophisticated combination of the necessary tools and the right personnel to regulate and manage the whole network:

  • Proactive, 24-hour monitoring of systems, devices, and technology for risk and vulnerability detection.
  • Prompt and efficient incident response.
  • Proficiency in all tools used by your company, including third-party sources.
  • Software application setup, upgrading, and troubleshooting.
  • Monitoring and controlling firewall and breach safety systems.
  • Assessment and remediation of virus protection, malware, and ransomware services.
  • Management of email, audio, and video traffic.
  • Patch administration and access controls.
  • In-depth examination of security log data from various resources.
  • Evaluation, detection, and documentation of security trends.
  • Investigation of security breaches to determine the underlying cause of attacks and avoid potential threats.
  • Policy and procedural enforcement.
  • Backup, storage, and recovery.

The SOC incorporates a range of technologies to collect information for patterns and notify personnel of possible risks. However, the SOC does more than merely deal with problems when they arise.

The SOC is responsible for identifying weaknesses — both external and internal to the company — through continual software and hardware risk evaluation.

SOC personnel are searching for solutions to increase security on a proactive basis. Vulnerability assessment includes actively attempting to hack their system to expose loopholes, a process known as penetration testing.

SOC professionals ensure that the organization is using the necessary technologies and analyzing what is and isn’t working.

The Bottom Line

A SOC is essential for every organization that plans to grow its cyber operations and infrastructures. It also gives a high level of security. Whether you integrate SIEM and security capabilities into your NOC, outsource the majority or all SOC functions to third-party providers, or employ an in-house team, it’s critical to address the concerns that a SOC is meant to solve.

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